International Trade Policy

The inclusion of healthcare products in the United States Trade Representative (USTR) Section 301 proposed tariff policy will increase the cost of delivering quality and efficient healthcare in the United States and hinder our country’s ability to prepare and respond to public health events.

  • A significant number of medical products critical to everyday procedures, lifesaving surgeries, as well as products used for broad public health preparedness efforts are made outside of the United States
  • It is important for both Congress and the Administration to understand the complexities of the U.S. healthcare supply chain, so tariffs and trade policies do not create unintentional supply chain disruptions and product shortages
Tariffs
GA Alert
USTR Issues Additional Details of Proposed Tariff Increases on PPE & Syringes
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Tariffs
GA Alert
Administration Proposes Increased Tariffs On $18B Of Chinese Imports, Including Syringes & PPE
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Tariffs
Advocacy Letter
Letter to Ambassador Katherine Tai Re: Tariffs, Docket Number 2023-28770
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Background

In April 2018, the Administration released a list of Chinese imports subject to a new, 25% tariff as a result of an investigation conducted under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. The new Section 301 tariffs apply to over 1,300 Chinese imports. Among those listed are a number of products that healthcare providers rely on to conduct ongoing healthcare procedures and respond to public health events.

In June 2018, the USTR announced a final list of tariffs which applied to 818 of the 1,333 products that were included on the original proposed list. A 25% tariff on these products went into effect July 6, 2018. In a notice published August 16, 2018, the USTR determined to take additional action and add 25% tariffs to another list of products, which went into effect on Aug. 23, 2018. Then, on Sept. 17, 2018, USTR finalized tariffs on approximately $200 billion Chinese imports. Tariffs went into effect Sept. 24, 2018, initially at 10%.

After conducting a review of the tariff lists from 2018 and 2019, the USTR has recommended changes that include increases for medical products such as masks, gloves and needles and syringes.

Contact

Christina Lavoie

Christina Lavoie
Director of Policy
703-838-6138
lavoie@hida.org